professional home inspections, inc.

303-329-0014

303-674-4620 cell

discoverittom@gmail.com

www.professional-home-inspections.com


Confidential

VISUAL INSPECTION REPORT

Before reading the report.

I recommend looking at The Inspection Pictures

                                                              

SUBJECT PROPERTY

Your Street

Denver, Colorado


 

FOR THE EXCLUSIVE USE OF




 

REAL ESTATE AGENTS

SELLING AGENT

LISTING AGENT


 

 


 

CONSTRUCTION TYPE

Frame two story, built approximately 1987. The front of the house faces west.

 


 

INSPECTION CONDITIONS

The house was occupied and furnished at the time of inspection. The client attended the last part of the inspection. At the time of inspection it was 45° and clear with 4 inches of snow cover.

 


 

The property was inspected on Monday, March 28, 2016 from 9:00 a.m. to 1:35 p.m.


INSPECTED BY:


G. Thomas Martin, pres.

 

Please feel free to call Tom Martin at 303-329-0014 or 303-674-4620 cell if you have any questions about this report.

 

This inspection report is also attached to this email so it can be saved. The pictures can be downloaded from Google photos if you wish.



 

 

The following rating system and abbreviations are used throughout this report. See the comments for descriptive information and recommendations.



A . . . RATING



ACCEPTABLE

* STANDARD DESIGN

* STANDARD BUILDING PRACTICE

* MEETS INTENDED NEEDS

* IMMEDIATE ATTENTION NOT VISIBLE



? . . . RATING



QUESTIONABLE

* NOT FUNCTIONING PROPERLY

* NON-STANDARD BUILDING PRACTICE

* RECOMMEND SPECIALIST EVALUATION

* MAY NEED REPAIR OR REPLACEMENT

* APPROACHING END OF USEFUL LIFE

* POSSIBLE FIRE OR SAFETY HAZARD



U . . . RATING



UNACCEPTABLE

* FIRE OR SAFETY HAZARD

* UNACCEPTABLE DESIGN

* DOESN'T OPERATE

* NOT SERVING INTENDED PURPOSE

* NEEDS REPAIR OR REPLACEMENT



COMMENTS



IMMEDIATE ATTENTION

UNDERLINED COMMENTS ARE CONDITIONS THAT WE FEEL WARRANT IMMEDIATE CORRECTIVE ACTION BY THE APPROPRIATE PROFESSIONAL CONTRACTOR



N



NOT INSPECTED

NOT ABLE TO INSPECT DUE TO CONDITIONS

THIS SHOULD BE MADE ACCESSIBLE OR OPERATIONAL SO IT CAN BE CHECKED FOR ANY DEFICIENCIES THAT MAY EXIST.

NA

NOT APPLICABLE


 



NORMAL EXPECTED LIFE

 

REFERS TO THE NORMAL LIFE EXPECTANCY OF THIS TYPE OF MATERIAL OR COMPONENT ACCORDING TO INDUSTRY STANDARDS.         ACTUAL SERVICEABLE LIFE WILL DEPEND ON WEATHER, INSTALLATION, USE, AND PROPER MAINTENANCE.


SSR


SEE SPECIAL REPORT

THE BLUE HYPERLINKS CONNECT TO ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

 


 

 

VISUAL INSPECTION REPORT

Condition

EXTERIOR GROUNDS

A . . . DRIVEWAY

A- . . . SIDEWALKS

A- . . . RETAINING WALLS

? . . . DRAINAGE BY HOUSE

COMMENTS: Information about this neighborhood can be found at www.homefacts.com.

The exterior grounds could not be fully evaluated due to the snow cover. When the snow melts, check these grounds for any adverse conditions that could not be seen at this time.

The irrigation system is not included in this inspection. The irrigation valve is leaking indicating that the cutoff valve is not working properly and likely needs to be replaced. Water dripping into this during freezing weather can cause the pipes to burst. This may have caused the crack in the brick wall. The sprinkler heads should be set so they don’t irrigate any closer than 5' to the foundation. Check with the owner or installation company about the operation and winterization of this system. Make sure the system is winterized prior to October the 15th.

The tree branches should be trimmed to provide at least three-foot clearance from the house so they don’t rub and damage the house or provide access for animals.

Sealing the cracks in the concrete with a Self-Leveling Sealant will  keep the water out and extend the life of this concrete paving. See the link on Maintaining Concrete Driveways.

We recommend removing or covering any sharp metal landscape edging with a product called Guard-n-Edge or replacing it with stripping stone. This sharp metal landscape edging is notorious for cutting children and pets.

Some of the grading around the house should be sloping better to divert the water away from the foundation. See the link on Surface Water Control

The tree branches should be trimmed to provide at least three-foot clearance from the house so they don’t rub and damage the house or provide access for animals.

The wood retaining wall are starting to decay. Eventually I recommend replacing them with masonry.

There is some trash around the property that should be removed and properly disposed of.

Consider removing the trees near the foundation.


 

 

EXTERIOR STRUCTURE

A . . . FOUNDATION

A- . . . WALL STRUCTURE

Type: 2" X 4" wood studs

A . . . FRONT PORCH/DECK

A . . . railings & steps

A . . . BACK PORCH/DECK

A . . . railings & steps

A . . . SIDING

Type: brick and hardboard

A/? . . . WINDOWS

Type: double pane insulated glass wood

A . . . TRIM

A . . . HOSE SPIGOTS

?. . RECEPTACLES

There is a horizontal crack in the brick veneer at the Northwest corner of the house by the gas meter. I recommend monitoring this crack and consulting with the licensed structural engineer if you observe any significant movement.

The rusted gas piping by the meter needs to be painted.

A breach in the seal has allowed condensation to develop between the window panes near the electric meter.

Some of the insect screening is missing or damaged.

The exterior trim is due for repainting.

The flaking paint should be scraped off and the surface properly prepared before painting.

We recommend caulking around the where all dissimilar building materials join. This will keep the insects out, prevent moisture intrusion and reduce the amount heat loss.

The damaged weatherproof covers for the electrical receptacle should be replaced.

The broken cover for the landscape lighting may need to be replace.


 

 

A . . . ELECTRICAL PANEL

Type: circuit breaker

Make: I-T-E

A . . . SERVICE CABLE

Type: underground aluminum

200. AMP/240 VOLT SERVICE

A . . . CIRCUIT PROTECTION

A . . . CIRCUIT WIRING

Type: copper

? . . . GFCI PROTECTION

MAIN ELECTRIC CUTOFF

 Southeast inside corner outside wall


Siemens circuit breakers will work in this panel.


Consider upgrading the safety of all of the receptacles in hazardous locations by having a licensed electrician install GFCI protection on them. See the Appendix on GFCI’s www.professional-home-inspections.com/at/phi/SSR/GFCI.html


 

 

ROOF SYSTEMS

A . . . ROOF COVERING

Type: asphalt composition shingle

Inspected from up to the roof and from the ground with a remote camera on the 28 foot fiberglass pole

35-45 years normal expected life

1 year approximate age

A . . . FLASHING

A . . . SKYLIGHTS

A/? . . . GUTTER/DOWN SPOUTS

Type: aluminum & steel down spouts

The roof was 40 % snow covered at the time of inspection. The exposed portions appear to be in satisfactory condition. When the snow melts, the rest of the roof should be checked for any deficiencies that were not apparent during this limited inspection.


I recommend finding out if there is documentation that this is an UL class IV impact resistant shingle that would be eligible for a 20% discount on most homeowners insurance


The rusted steel downspouts need to be replaced.



Down spout extensions need to be properly connected to carry the water away from the foundation.


 

 

A . . . HEATER FLUE

 . . . . metal

A . . . ample height


A . . . FIREPLACE FLUE

 . .. . metal

A . . . ample height



 


 

 

ATTIC

A . . . ROOF STRUCTURE

Type: manufactured trusses &

2" X 6" rafters

A . . . ROOF SHEATHING

Type: OSB wafer board

A . . . VENTILATION

Inspected from the access holes and from within the house

A . . . INSULATION

10" Blown fiberglass

9" Batt fiberglass

no signs of leakage

A . . . flue clearance

?. . . WIRING

A . . . EXHAUST VENTS



Because of the type of ceiling construction, portions of the attic inspection are limited to checking the interior ceilings for signs of leakage.



A cover plate is needed on the open electrical junction box.

The loose electrical wiring should be secured every four and one-half foot and within 12 inches of the electrical boxes.


 

 

MASTER BEDROOM

A . . . DOORS

?. . . WINDOWS

A . . . REGISTERS

A . . . RECEPTACLES

A . . . GAS FIREPLACE


The north window needs to be adjusted so it will close tightly.

I recommend installing smoke detectors in each of the bedrooms.


 

 

MASTER BATHROOM

A- . . . DOORS

A . . . WINDOWS

A . . . FLOORS

A . . . REGISTERS

A . . . SINK & FAUCET

A . . . plumbing

A . . . TUB & SHOWER

A . . . shower walls

A-/U . . . faucets

A . . . caulking

A . . . VENTILATION

A . . . TOILET

? . . . RECEPTACLES


The closet doors are missing. They may be stored in the basement front of the furnace

The loose bathtub spigot needs to be secured.

The hand sprayer is missing, the shower faucet handles are loose and not working properly. A licensed plumber should correct this.

The keeper on the powder room door needs to be adjusted so the door will latch.

The trim needs to be painted.

I did not observe an access panel for the inspection and servicing of the bubble bath equipment. One should be installed so this area can be checked for any deficiencies that may exist and for the regular service and maintenance of this equipment.

The loose bathtub spigot needs to be tightened.

See the link on Caulking

I recommend installing GFCI protection on these receptacles., www.professional-home-inspections.com/at/phi/SSR/GFCI.html


 

 

BEDROOM E upstairs

A . . . DOORS

?. . . WINDOWS

A . . . REGISTERS

A . . . RECEPTACLES


A breach in the seal has allowed condensation to develop between the window panes.

The yellow stained carpeting may need to be replaced.


 

 

LOFT ROOM NW upstairs

A . . . DOORS

? . . . WINDOWS

A . . . REGISTERS

A . . . RECEPTACLES


A breach in the seal has allowed condensation to develop between the window panes.


 

 

BEDROOM W upstairs

A . . . DOORS

A . . . WINDOWS

A . . . REGISTERS

A . . . RECEPTACLES

The ceiling fan wobbles at high speeds. The blades may need to be balanced or straightened. Make sure the fan is properly secured to an electrical box specifically designed for ceiling fans. The globe below the ceiling fan light is missing.

One of the window shutters is broken.

The closet doors are missing


 

 

BEDROOM SW upstairs

A . . . DOORS

A . . . WINDOWS

A . . . REGISTERS

A . . . RECEPTACLES


Smoke detectors are needed in all bedrooms.



 


BATHROOM upstairs

A . . . DOORS

A . . . WINDOWS

A . . . FLOORS

A . . . REGISTERS

A . . . SINK & FAUCET

A . . . plumbing

A . . . SHOWER

A . . . shower walls

A . . . faucets

A . . . caulking

A . . . VENTILATION

A . . . TOILET

A. . . RECEPTACLES



A suitable bumper is needed to prevent the glass shower door from banging into the metal towel bar.


See the link on Caulking



 

 

FOYER

A . . . ENTRANCE DOOR

A . . . CLOSET DOOR

A . . . WINDOWS

A . . . FLOOR

A . . . RECEPTACLES

The storm panels are missing for the front security door.

Store a spare key in the double cylinder lock or close by so no one is locked in during an emergency.



 

 

POWDER ROOM

A . . . DOORS

no. . . WINDOWS

A . . . FLOORS

A . . . REGISTERS

A . . . SINK & FAUCET

A . . . plumbing

A . . . VENTILATION

A . . . TOILET

A . . . RECEPTACLES






 


 

 

LIVING ROOM

A . . . DOORS

?. . . WINDOWS

A . . . REGISTERS

A . . . RECEPTACLES


A breach in the seal has allowed condensation to develop between the window panes.


 

 

DINING ROOM

A . . . DOORS

A . . . WINDOWS

A . . . REGISTERS

A . . . RECEPTACLES


The dog door should be secured or the window replace.


 

 

KITCHEN

A . . . DOORS

A . . . WINDOWS

A . . . FLOOR

A . . . REGISTERS

A . . . CABINETS

A . . . COUNTER TOPS

A . . . SINK & FAUCET

A . . . PLUMBING

A . . . EXHAUST SYSTEM

Type: surface vent

A . . . DISPOSAL

? . . . RECEPTACLES


A licensed electrician should replace the broken light inside the cabinet.


The loose trim below the dishwasher needs to be properly secured.


The water filter elements should be changed regularly.


The loose cabinet door needs to be properly secured.

The ideal hot water temperature is 120°.

 I recommend installing GFCI protection on these receptacles., www.professional-home-inspections.com/at/phi/SSR/GFCI.html


 

 

FAMILY ROOM

A . . . DOORS

A . . . WINDOWS

A . . . REGISTERS

A . . . RECEPTACLES

A/? . . . GAS FIREPLACE


A screen needs to be installed in front of the fireplace.


 

 

LAUNDRY ROOM

A . . . DOORS

A . . . WINDOWS

A . . . FAUCET

A . . . DRYER HOOK UP

Type: electric

A . . . DRYER VENT

A . . . RECEPTACLES

no. . . FLOOR DRAIN

I did not observe a floor drain in this room. Periodically check the hoses to the washing machine. If they become swollen or corroded, they should be replaced immediately. Consider using hoses that are reinforced with wire mesh. The spigots to the washing machine should be turned off when the washing machine is not in use. Consider installing FloodStop electric solenoids that will automatically turn the water off if any moisture is sensed on the floor. These can found on the internet and can be purchased for about $150.00 a set. They are easily installed by screwing them on just before the hoses.


 

 

GARAGE

A . . . OVERHEAD DOOR

A . . . DOOR OPENER

A . . . auto-reverse

A . . . DOORS

A . . . WINDOWS

? . . . FLOOR

? . . . FIRE SEPARATION

A . . . RECEPTACLES


The concrete floor is scaling. There was probably too much water added to the original concrete mix. Avoid using salt or calcium chloride

Sealing the cracks in the concrete floor with a Self-Leveling Sealant will  keep the water out and minimize further movement of this concrete floor. See the link on Maintaining Concrete Driveways.


 

 

INTERIOR

A . . . FLOOR COVERING

Type: Carpet, oak, & ceramic tile

A . . . WALLS & CEILINGS

Type: drywall

?. . . RAILINGS & STEPS

A/N . . . SMOKE DETECTORS

A. . SAFETY GLAZING

Prior to moving, felt protectors should be installed on the bottom of the furniture to prevent scratching the wood flooring.

A hand railing is needed on the basement steps.

The inspection of the interior components is limited due to the placement of furniture and storage of personal property. Once these things are moved, check for any deficiencies such as nail holes that were not apparent during this inspection.

I noticed a dog living in this house. There are several florescent stains from urine in the lower family room. Consider replacing the carpeting. An enzyme type deodorant, such as Odormute or Expel, can be effective in managing animal odors. These products are usually sold at pet stores. Consider calling Stink Inc. About these odors 303.761.5414 www.stinkinc.com.

A 380-385 nm UV light is useful in identifying pet urine.

Smoke detectors over 10 years old should be replaced.

There should be a smoke detector located in each bedroom.

We recommend keeping carbon monoxide detectors within 15 feet of all bedrooms as required by Colorado State law

Consider installing Nest, battery-powered, Smoke + Carbon Monoxide Alarms.


 

 

GAME ROOM downstairs

A . . . DOORS

A . . . WINDOWS

A . . . REGISTERS

A . . . RECEPTACLES

There are quite a few florescent urine stains in the carpeting. Consider replacing this carpeting or at a minimum have it cleaned by an odor specialist.

There is evidence of previous leakage on the ceiling tile in the closet. I suspect this is from a previous problem with the laundry room above.


 

 

BASEMENT & CRAWLSPACE

A . . . FOUNDATION

Type: Poured concrete

? . . . SIGNS OF MOISTURE

A . . . FLOOR STRUCTURE

Type: 2" x 10" engineered plywood TJI joists & concrete slab

A . . . FLOOR SLAB

no. . . SUMP PUMP

A . . . INSULATION

A . . . WIRING

A . . . RECEPTACLES

The inspection of the interior components in the downstairs is particularly limited due to the storage of personal property. Once these things are moved, check for any deficiencies such as nail holes that were not apparent during this inspection.


There is evidence of moisture infiltration. Establishing better grading around the foundation, keeping the rain gutters clean, and discharging the roof runoff away from the foundation is indicated to manage this. See the link on Surface Water Control

You should find out what the bent vent in the crawlspace is from. The crawlspace was not accessible.


 

 

PLUMBING

A . . . WATER SUPPLY PIPING

Type: copper

A . . . WATER PRESSURE

A . . . DRAIN & VENT PIPING

Type: ABS plastic

A . . . functional drainage

A . . . LEAKS

A . . . HOT WATER HEATER

Make: Rheem

Fuel: natural gas

12-15 years normal expected life

<1 year heaters approx. age

75. . . gallon storage capacity

A . . . VENTING

A . . . SAFETY CONTROLS

A . . . GAS PIPING

MAIN WATER CUTOFF VALVE

 west basement wall







The leaking irrigation valve needs to be replace. At that time consider installing an additional main water cutoff valve that will allow the irrigation to run while water is shut off to the house.








I recommend contacting Jesse at the $99 Sewer Cleaning and Inspection Company http://99dollarrooter.com at (720) 276-9900 or Dan Echols of See Inside Sewer Scope at 720.936.3279 to video this sewer. www.seeinsidesewerscope.com .


 

 

HEATING SYSTEM

A . . . HEATING EQUIPMENT

Make: Frigidaire

Fuel: natural gas fired

Type: forced air furnace

A . . . blowers

25-30 years normal useful life

12 years systems approx. age

A . . . VENTING

A . . . SAFETY CONTROLS

A . . . CLEARANCES

A . . . COMBUSTION AIR

A . . . GAS PIPING

A . . . DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM

A . . . THERMOSTATS

      MAIN GAS CUTOFF VALVE

NW corner outside wall




Avoid using or installing whole house humidifiers as they can damage the siding and cause respiratory ailments. I recommend keeping the water supply to the humidifier turned off or removing it altogether. See the link on Humidifiers.


I recommend keeping a wrench near the main gas cut off.



Consider installing a Nest thermostat to reduce your utility bills.


 

 

COOLING EQUIPMENT

?/N . . . EQUIPMENT

Make: Rheem

Fuel: electric

Type: refrigeration compression

25-30 years normal expected life

 28 years systems approx. age

A . . . DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM

 ° Room air temperature

 ° Cooled air temperature

A . . . THERMOSTAT

The air conditioner has already served its normal useful life. You should anticipate replacing it. I recommend either a Trane or Lennox unit they tender be quieter than others and consider installing an attic fan that may allow you to downsize the condenser slightly.

The missing insulation on the suction lines to the expansion coil above the furnace should be replaced so condensation does not form on the cold pipe.


The air conditioning could not be safely or effectively tested as it was below 65° during the inspection. When it warms up, the system could be tested by measuring the temperature differential. See the link on Testing Air Conditioners


 

 

Please feel free to call Tom Martin at 303-674-4620 if you have any questions about this report.

 


professional home inspections, inc.

303-329-0014

303-674-4620 cell

discoverittom@gmail.com

www.professional-home-inspections.com


STANDARD RMC ASHI

HOME INSPECTION AUTHORIZATION AND CONTRACT

 SUBJECT PROPERTY: Your Street

1.        Client hereby authorizes and contracts for Professional Home Inspections, Inc. to perform a visual inspection at the Subject Property for a fee of $425.00, plus $25.00 for a 2 hour Radon screening. The client agrees to the Terms and Conditions in this Contract. The Inspection Report and its contents are intended for the exclusive use of and are the non-transferrable property of the Client. The inspection fee is payable at the time of the inspection.

 

2.        My signature below acknowledges that I have had the opportunity to read and understand both pages of the Standard RMC ASHI Home Inspection Authorization and Contract and accept the terms, conditions, and limitations as outlined below.

 

 

                                                                                                                                                 

                                   Client Signature                                                                    Date

        Provide a copy of the report to your real estate agent.

SCOPE OF INSPECTION

3. *  The scope of this inspection (“Scope”) is limited to the visual examination of the safely and readily accessible portions of the structural, heating, cooling, plumbing, roofing, electrical and components of the Subject Property specified in this Contract and the Inspection Report for conditions which are adversely affecting their normally intended function or operation within the limits set forth in this Contract and the Inspection Report. No other systems, items or appliances are included in this inspection. The inspection performed is not intended as a substitute for a sellers disclosure statement.

 

4. *      Excluded is any inspection of any systems or items not included in the Inspection Report including but not limited to the following: any information pertaining to manufacturers recalls of any component, detached buildings or equipment, the presence of insects or other pests, low-voltage systems, swimming pools, saunas, spa, whirlpool, and hot tub systems, electrostatic precipitators or electronic air cleaners or filters, septic systems, any component or system which is underground, private water systems or equipment, wells and well pumps, cisterns, ponds, fountains, water quality or volume, water conditioning systems, elevators, lifts, dumbwaiters, audio and video systems, freezers, central vacuum systems, microwave ovens, built-in blenders, ovens, stoves, refrigerators, trash compactors, dishwashers, washing machines, dryers, fencing, landscaping, trees, irrigation systems, active and passive solar systems, soils, computer control systems, security systems, and any inspection or testing for any toxic or dangerous substances including asbestos, toxic molds, lead, or gases including radon and formaldehyde, other then gases typically used as fuel for home heating systems, or any system or item not included in the Inspection Report.

 

5.*        This inspection is not technically exhaustive. No engineering tests will be made. No examination will be made to determine compliance with any governmental ordinance, regulation or code. The Inspection Report is not to be considered an implied or express warranty or insurance on the Subject Property or its components concerning future use, operability, habitability or suitability. The purpose of the inspection is for client to be informed of as many conditions as possible within the brief period of time allotted for the inspection. Client has no expectation of being notified of all conditions and waives any claim to conditions which are not reported. Professional Home Inspections, Inc. is not responsible for any condition affecting any system or component which occurs subsequent to the inspection or is intermittent and not detectable during the inspection. This inspection will comply with the STANDARDS OF PRACTICE OF THE ROCKY MOUNTAIN CHAPTER OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY OF HOME INSPECTORS unless otherwise noted and where conditions permit.

6. *      CLIENT ACKNOWLEDGES THAT PROFESSIONAL HOME INSPECTIONS, INC. WARRANTS ITS INSPECTION SERVICES WILL BE PERFORMED IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE SCOPE, THE INSPECTION REPORT, AND THE STANDARDS OF PRACTICE OF THE ROCKY MOUNTAIN CHAPTER OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY OF HOME INSPECTORS ONLY. THIS IS A LIMITED AND NON-TRANSFERABLE WARRANTY AND IS THE ONLY WARRANTY GIVEN BY PROFESSIONAL HOME INSPECTIONS, INC. PROFESSIONAL HOME INSPECTIONS, INC. MAKES AND CLIENT RECEIVES NO OTHER WARRANTY, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED. ALL OTHER WARRANTIES INCLUDING WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE EXPRESSLY EXCLUDED. THIS STATED EXPRESS WARRANTY IS IN LIEU OF ALL LIABILITIES OR OBLIGATIONS OF PROFESSIONAL HOME INSPECTIONS, INC. FOR DAMAGES ARISING OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE PERFORMANCE OF THE INSPECTION AND ANY DELIVERY AND USE OF AND RELIANCE ON THE INSPECTION REPORT. CLIENT WAIVES ANY CLAIM FOR CONSEQUENTIAL, EXEMPLARY OR INCIDENTAL DAMAGES, EVEN IF PROFESSIONAL HOME INSPECTIONS, INC. HAS BEEN ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES.

 

7. *      IN THE EVENT OF A BREACH OR A FAILURE OF THE FOREGOING WARRANTY, OR NEGLIGENT INSPECTION BY PROFESSIONAL HOME INSPECTIONS, INC. (EXCLUDING GROSS NEGLIGENCE OR WILLFUL MISCONDUCT), CLIENT AGREES THAT THE LIABILITY OF PROFESSIONAL HOME INSPECTIONS, INC. AND OF ITS AGENTS, EMPLOYEES, AND INSPECTORS, FOR CLAIMS OR DAMAGES, COSTS OF DEFENSE AND SUIT, ATTORNEY’S FEES AND EXPENSES AND PAYMENTS ARISING OUT OF OR IN ANY WAY CONNECTED WITH ERRORS OR OMISSIONS IN THE INSPECTION OR THE INSPECTION REPORT SHALL BE LIMITED TO LIQUIDATED DAMAGES IN AN AMOUNT EQUAL TO ALL AMOUNTS PAID FOR THE INSPECTION TO PROFESSIONAL HOME INSPECTIONS, INC. BY CLIENT. Client and Professional Home Inspections, Inc. acknowledge the liquidated damages are not intended as a penalty but are intended (I) to reflect the fact that actual damages may be difficult and impractical to ascertain; (ii) to allocate risk among Professional Home Inspections, Inc. and Client; and (iii) to enable Professional Home Inspections, Inc. to perform the inspection at the stated inspection fee. In the event of the tender by Professional Home Inspections, Inc. of a refund of the inspection fee, such refund shall be full and final settlement of all present and future claims and causes of action and Professional Home Inspections, Inc. shall be thereupon generally and fully released.

 

8. *      In the event client has a claim of a breach or failure of warranty, or for negligent inspection, Client shall provide Professional Home Inspections, Inc. with three (3) working days to reinspect the component or item before client repairs or replaces the component or item. This right of reinspection is to protect Professional Home Inspections, Inc. and client from the business practices of some contractors. If client fails to allow Professional Home Inspections, Inc. to reinspect, client waives any claim against Professional Home Inspections, Inc. with respect to the component or item.

 

9. *      No action, whether in contract or tort, shall be brought against Professional Home Inspections, Inc. in a court of law beyond the earlier of one year following the date of the inspection report or 120 days after discovery by client of the condition which forms the basis of the action.

 

10. *    If a claim is made against Professional Home Inspections, Inc. For any alleged error or omission or other act arising out of the performance of this inspection, and if Client fails to prove such claim, Client agrees to pay all costs and attorney’s fees incurred by Professional Home Inspections, Inc. And its inspectors.

 

11. *    Inspection Report is not intended for use by anyone other than the Client. No third party shall have any right arising from this contract or the Inspection Report. In consideration of the furnishing of the Inspection Report, the Client agrees to indemnify and hold harmless Professional Home Inspections, Inc., and its inspectors for all costs, expenses, legal fees, awards, settlements, and judgements in any legal proceeding brought by any third party who claims that he/she relied on representations made in such Inspection Report and was damaged thereby. Client’s request that Professional Home Inspections, Inc. release copies of the Inspection Report shall be at Client’s risk with respect to the contents of this paragraph.*These Standard Home Inspection Contract Terms and Conditions have been approved by the Rocky Mountain Chapter of the American Society of Home Inspectors (ASHI) for use by certified ASHI Home Inspectors.

 


professional home inspections, inc.

303.329.0014

discoverittom@gmail.com

www.professional-home-inspections.com

 

RADON REPORT


The radon monitor measured 1.3 pCi/L during the one hour testing period. The individual hourly measurements are typically within + 50% of the two-day closed house radon average, providing the windows and doors are properly closed for the twelve hours prior to this test. This test should only be used as an inexpensive indicator for the need to do a $175.00, full two day CRM radon test, according to EPA Protocol. It should not be used in negotiating a real estate contract or as an indicator to mitigate.


UNDERSTANDING RADON

by

G. Thomas Martin

We realize most people find it difficult to understand radon; A colorless, odorless and inert radioactive gas. You cannot see it, smell it, or feel it; Yet we cannot completely avoid breathing radon. There is about 0.35 pCi/L of radon in the outside air we breathe. Understanding the risks associated with radiation exposure is even more perplexing. I hope that reading this article, will enable you to make an informed decision about the radon levels measured in your house.

  1.WHERE DOES RADON COME FROM?

Radon comes from the natural radioactive decay of radium and uranium found in the soil beneath the house. The amount of radon in the soil depends on complex soil chemistry, that varies from one house to the next. Radon levels in the soil range from a few hundred to several thousands of pCi/L. The amount of radon that escapes from the soil to enter the house depends on the weather, soil porosity, soil moisture, and the suction within the house.
 
2.HOW DOES RADON GET INTO THE HOUSE?

Houses act like large chimneys. As the air in the house warms, it rises to leak out the attic openings and around the upper floor windows. This creates a small suction at the lowest level of the house, pulling the radon out of the soil and into the house. You can test this on a cold day by opening a top floor window an inch. You will notice warm air from the house rushing out that opening; Yet, if you open a basement window an inch, you will feel the cold outside air rushing in. This suction is what pulls the radon out of the soil and into the house.

You might think caulking the cracks and the openings in the basement floor will stop the radon from entering the house. However, scientific studies show, it only takes enough unsealed cracks or pin holes in the caulking to equal a hole 1/2" in diameter to let all the radon in. It is unlikely that caulking the accessible cracks and joints will permanently seal the openings radon needs to enter the house.,The radon levels will still likely remain unchanged.
 
Fortunately, there are other extremely effective means of keeping radon out of your home. Throughout the country, several million people have already tested for radon. Some houses tested as high as 2,000-3,000 pCi/L; Yet, there hasn't been one house that could not mitigate to an acceptable level. Mitigation usually costs between $500-$1500.
 
3.WHAT ABOUT RADON IN WELL WATER?

Underground well water can transport the radon from the soil into the house, when taking a shower, doing laundry, or washing dishes. It takes about 10,000 pCi/L of radon in water to contribute 1.0 pCi/L of radon in air throughout the house. The ratio of radon in water to radon in bathroom air while showering can be much higher, about 300 to 1. The average Colorado well tests about 3,000 pCi/L with one well testing more than 3,000,000 pCi/L.
 
4. WHAT ABOUT RADON IN CITY WATER?

If your water comes from a municipal reservoir supply, you need not worry about radon in the water. When radon in water is stored in a reservoir for more than 30 days, the radon decays away to practically nothing. Every 3.825 days half the radon disappears through natural radioactive decay.
 
5.WHAT IS THE RISK OF RADON EXPOSURE?

Scientists believe radon exposure is the second leading cause of lung cancer. When radon decays, it shoots off alpha particles. These are small, heavy, electrically charged, sub-atomic particles consisting of two protons and two neutrons. If an alpha particle strikes the chromosomes in a lung cell, it could alter the way that cell reproduces. Our bodies immune system should recognize and destroy these mutant cells before they can multiply over the next 10 to 20 years into a recognizable cancerous growth.

Some people’s immune system is better than others. Because of these inherent differences, radon doesn't affect everyone the same.
 
6. HOW SERIOUS A RISK IS RADON?

According to the following EPA radon risk chart, radon is a serious health problem.                                                            

If 1,000 people were exposed to this level over a life time, who are:

Annual Radon Level        Smokers                   Never Smokers
20 pCi/L                  14% or 135 people      0.8% or 8 people could get lung cancer

10 pCi/L                    7% or  71 people       0.4% or 4 people could get lung cancer

 4 pCi/L                      3% or 29 people        0.2% or 2 people could get lung cancer

 2 pCi/L                      2% or 15 people        0.1% or 1 person could get lung cancer

7. DO SCIENTISTS AGREE THAT RADON IS DANGEROUS TO BREATHE?

There is little disagreement that breathing the hundreds of pCi/L of radon that caused thousands of uranium miners to get fatal lung cancer is definitely harmful. Many scientists disagree with the EPA about what the level of radon should be before it should be reduced.

The EPA studied the lung cancer risk of uranium miners exposed to 400 pCi/L. They assume the risk of a home owner exposed to 4 pCi/L to be one hundredth as much. Based on this assumption, the EPA guideline level of 4 pCi/L represents a much greater risk than allowed for other environmental pollutants.

Other scientists have tested more than 70,000 homes across the United States. This study shows the counties with the highest average radon levels had the lowest incidence of cancer. Perhaps, breathing the low levels of radon found in the home environment, might not be harmful. Neither study fully accounts for all the different confounding factors that can cause cancer. The truth probably lies somewhere between these two theories.
 
8. WHO DO I BELIEVE?

In 1988 the United States Congress passed legislation, directing

the EPA to work toward a long term national goal, "The air within buildings in the United States should be as free of radon as the ambient air outside of buildings." Real estate agents are hired and paid by the seller, to represent the sellers economic interests, in the sale of their house. ,Understandably, you might get two completely different opinions about radon, depending whether you ask the EPA, or your real estate agent. Because you have hired us to test for radon, and explain the test results. We will offer our opinion on the subject, and guidance on a prudent course of action.
 
9. WHAT SHOULD I DO ABOUT THE LEVELS OF RADON IN MY HOME?

The following represents our opinion, based on our understanding of the radon issue from several sources.

  A. If the house tests above 20 pCi/L most experts agree it is prudent to install a system that can permanently reduce your families exposure to radon.

  B. If the house tests below 4 pCi/L most experts agree that there is a relatively low probability of significant health risk at this low level of exposure. However, we recommend retesting the radon levels once you move in, to verify this low reading. Industry surveys show that up to 30% of the radon tests in real estate transactions are subject to some ventilation. "LET THE BUYER BEWARE". We once
 
We once tested a house, that measured 168 pCi/L in a child's bedroom. The selling agent ordered a retest by a tester known to test on the second floor with the windows open. He told my clients the house only measured 3.5 pCi/L and they didn't have a radon problem. Although he never gave my clients a written report stating this.

  C. If the house tests between 4 and 20 pCi/L there is no need for immediate panic, but you will have to make some difficult decisions. About 50% of the houses we test fall in this gray area. The average Colorado home measures 5.9 pCi/L. The national average is 1.5 pCi/L and outside air measures about 0.35 pCi/L. The closer to 4 or 20 pCi/L the easier the decision should be. The most difficult decisions are in the 10 to 12 pCi/L range.
 
10. WHAT OTHER FACTORS SHOULD I LOOK AT IN DECIDING WHETHER TO MITIGATE OR NOT?

Cigarette smokers should keep their exposure to radon as low as possible. Smokers have eight times the risk from radon as non smokers. Smokers who reduce their radon exposure from 6.0 pCi/L to 2.0 pCi/L, will receive as much beneficial risk reduction as the non smoker who reduces their exposure from 34 pCi/L to 2 pCi/L.

If the house was tested in an infrequently used basement. It may have measured a radon level that is two to three times the actual level you are exposed to, spending most of your time upstairs.

You can reduce your family’s annual radon exposure about 40%, if you open the basement windows a few inches to allow cross ventilation from May till September. This may be appropriate for slightly elevated houses that don't need year round reductions.

People with young children should be more concerned with the possible consequences of radon exposure 20 years from now than someone in their late sixties or seventies.

Families with a hereditary predisposition of cancer should be more concerned about radon exposure than families who don't have any history of cancer.

If you work for a company that might transfer you in the future, our employer probably will hire a relocation company to purchase your home. Today, most relocation companies insist that the house test below 4 pCi/L before they will buy it. Some buyers have adopted this position; Anything below 4 pCi/L is fine while anything above 4 pCi/L is unacceptable. This unfortunate misinterpretation of EPA guidance, could cause you to pay for a radon mitigation system when selling your home. At this time your family would not receive any benefit from the radon reductions.

The decision, "What to do about radon?" is a personal choice that only you can make. Some people feel it is best to reduce as many of life's risks as they can. Other people feel the money spent installing and operating a radon mitigation system on a moderately elevated home could be put to better use, having regular family medical and dental check ups, or making other safety improvements in their home.
 
11.WHAT IF, I DECIDE TO REDUCE THE RADON LEVELS IN MY HOME? If you feel the radon levels are high enough to justify installing a radon mitigation system, we recommend installing a good quality, durable, energy efficient system. All our radon reports testing above 4 pCi/L, include detailed specifications, describing the installation and materials needed to achieve this. It is best to have all mitigation contractors bid on installing the system exactly as specified in this report. All too often the sellers or their agents end up deciding, who will do the work, and how it will be done.,Their main concern is that it be installed as cheaply as possible to get the radon levels down below 4 pCi/L for the retest. Often they have the contractor who installed the system, do the retesting to verify it is below 4 pCi/L, before he gets paid. This could create a possible conflict of interest.
 
12. WHAT SHOULD I LOOK FOR IN A PROPERLY INSTALLED SYSTEM?

  A. Install all fans outside the living area of the house, so all interior piping is under negative pressure. Many contractors find it cheaper and easier to put the fan in the basement near an existing electrical outlet. Often these fans and

piping develop leaks. This could allow the system to start pulling the thousands of pCi/L of radon out of the ground and blow it into the basement or crawlspace; thus making the radon levels in the house higher than they where originally.

   B. The high radon concentration air blowing from the fan should discharge above the roof, or at least ten feet from any doors, windows or decks. No one wants to breathe hundreds or thousands of pCi/L coming from these fans.

   C. Dig the suction pit under the floor as large as possible, or make sure it intersects the void beneath a grade-beam foundation.

   D. Seal crawlspaces with a gas membrane, made of cross-laminated polyethylene, placed between two layers of 30 lb. tar paper, to protect it from damage. Make sure the membrane is tightly fastened to the foundation walls, with plywood strips and sealed with industrial grade urethane caulking. It is cheaper to install one layer of regular polyethylene directly over the soil, and fasten it to the walls with duct tape, glue or caulking. This method will reduce the radon levels, but the single layer of regular polyethylene gets torn when someone crawls across it. Duct tape or glue usually falls off the wall within a month or so. When this happens, the system will still keep the radon levels down, but the fan will start pulling large amounts of heated air out of the house. The added cold air could subject the crawlspace plumbing to freezing and increase the cost of heating your home as much as $200.00 to $300.00 a year. This unnecessary loss of heat could add up to $20,000.00 to $30,000.00 over the hundred-year life of the house. The money saved on the initial installation might not be such a bargain after all.

   E. Caulk the large cracks and joints in the concrete floor slab to prevent unnecessary heat loss.

   F. Install a manometer or warning device to alert you if anything goes wrong with the system.

   G. Permanently label all systems, with the contractors name, phone number, operation & maintenance instructions and a place to note all radon test results. The people living in the house 15 to 75 years from now will need to know what this system is, and why it is needed.
 
13. WHO SHOULD PAY TO GET THE RADON REDUCED?

If you are buying a house, this is strictly a matter of negotiation for which there are no hard and fast rules. Some people will choose to follow one of the GOLDEN RULES, "Do unto others as you would have them do unto you", or " He who has the gold makes the rules". No matter who ends up paying for the system, it is in your best interest that you are the one to select the contractor and specify how the work will be done. If you leave these decisions to others, you might not end up with the type of system you want to have. Most contractors will give you a written bid of exactly how much the system will cost when you have them install it.

Do not worry if the radon can be successfully reduced; This is a sure thing. In most cases, contractors will guarantee that they will reduce the levels to below 4 pCi/L. Properly installed systems usually get the radon down to below 2 pCi/L and sometimes even below 1 pCi/L. We have tested several houses that originally measured more than 100 pCi/L, that where mitigated to levels below 2 pCi/L.
 
14. HOW MUCH DOES IT COST TO OPERATE THESE SYSTEMS?

Most systems are powered by a 90-watt fan that use less than $52.00 worth of electricity a year. These fans should last about 14.7 years and presently cost $125.00 to replace. If the system is properly installed and well sealed, there shouldn't be any noticeable increases in the heating bills. However, if the cracks and joints in a finished basement cannot be sealed, the heating cost might increase slightly. Check this on a cold day by feeling the amount of warm air blowing from the fan. ,15.HOW CAN I LEARN MORE ABOUT RADON?

You can call the EPA at (303) 293-1709. They will be happy to answer your questions and can send you their pamphlets about radon. They can send you a list of radon contractors and tell you how to get their technical publications about radon and radon mitigation.

You can call the Colorado Department of Health at 303.331.4816. They can be particularly helpful with radon in water questions.
  
Radiation health effects science, and associated public policies are often misrepresented, and public funds wasted, to support radiation protection policy, that provides no public health benefit. See Radiation Hormesis
 
Graphs showing the variability of radon

Various Guideline Levels for Radon in Existing Homes *

USA EPA (Environmental Protection Agency)

4.0 pCi/l

Canada

21.6 pCi/l

Sweden

10.8 pCi/l

ICRP (International Commission on Radiation Protection)

16.2 pCi/l

WHO (World Health Organization)

10.8 pCi/l

NCRP (National Council on Radiation Protection)

8.0 pCi/l

*assuming 50% equilibrium and converting from Working Levels to pCi/L where needed.

 

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